Faces of AOS: Evan M. Adams Bio

• Email:
evan.adams@briloon.org

• Twitter Handle:
@eco_evan

• Website/Blog/Etc:
http://www.briloon.org/evan-adams-m-s-ph-d-candidate

• My position with AOS:
Early Professional Committee Member and Subcommittee — Professional Development Co-Chair

• My current full-time title and institution:
Quantitative Ecologist, Biodiversity Research Institute

• My current career stage:
Early Professional

• My lineage of mentors/labs:
Masters- Peter Frederick at the University of Florida
Ph.D. – Brian Olsen at the University of Maine.
Post-doc – Beth Gardner at the University of Washington.

• #badlyexplainyourjob:
I want to know how birds respond to environmental change. So I get help counting birds from a bunch of people, figure out who is the best at counting birds, then correct everybody’s counts and figure out why bird populations change.

• My favorite bird and why:
The Blackpoll Warbler because they fly for three days over the open ocean and are tiny.

• I am involved with AOS because:
I am interested in both bird conservation and science and the AOS is an organization that is committed to both.

• The best part about being a member of AOS is:
The community of excellent scientists and the learning I get to do with them.

• Birds are important to me because:
Birds are beautiful animals that tell us really interesting and important things about how the world works. I like to like to do research on them so we can understand those things better and also do the best possible job of keeping the current diversity of birds on this planet.

• Advice I have to offer a student (master’s level or younger) in ornithology:
Find a great mentor who can both get you excited about science but also turn that passion into great science.

• One ornithology question or problem I would like to solve or see solved:
I’d like to better understand how birds are going to adapt to climate change and non-analog climates.

 

Faces of AOS: Scott Sillett Bio

• Email:
silletts@si.edu

• Twitter Handle:
@ScottSillett

• Website/Blog/Etc:
https://nationalzoo.si.edu/conservation/t-scott-sillett

• My position with AOS:
Fellow; Editor in Chief of The Auk, beginning August 2018

• My current full-time title and institution:
Research Wildlife Biologist, Smithsonian Institution

• My current career stage:
Mid-Career

• My lineage of mentors/labs:
Undergrad: Stephen Russell, William Calder, University of Arizona;
Masters: J.V. Remsen, Jr., Louisiana State University;
PhD: Richard Holmes, Dartmouth College;
Postdoc: Jim Nichols, USGS Patuxent

• #badlyexplainyourjob:
I study individual, marked birds throughout their lives, preferably in pleasing locations.

• My favorite bird and why:
Greater Roadrunner (https://www.dailymotion.com/video/xxlwv5)

• I am involved with AOS because:
The AOS is my primary professional society and a great community of friends and scholars.

• The best part about being a member of AOS is:
Excellent journals and annual meetings.

• Birds are important to me because:
They are easy to count.

• Advice I have to offer a student (master’s level or younger) in ornithology:
Resist entropy.

• One ornithology question or problem I would like to solve or see solved:
Track migratory hummingbirds between breeding and winter grounds.

 

Faces of AOS: Olivia Jo Utley Bio

• Email:
utleyoli@msu.edu

• Twitter Handle:
@thewildologist

• Instagram:
@thewildologist

• My position with AOS:
Membership Committee member

• My current full-time title and institution:
PhD student at Michigan State University

• My current career stage:
Graduate Student

• My lineage of mentors/labs:
In undergrad I worked under Dr. David Westneat for 3 years at University of Kentucky, and I now work with Dr. Catherine Lindell at MSU

• #badlyexplainyourjob:
I put up next boxes in orchards and hope “good” birds come. Then I use a giant boat battery and a camera to do surveillance and see if the “good” birds chase the “bad” birds out of the orchards.

• My favorite bird and why:
This is so so so tough, because I can find a reason to love every one of them, but I’m gonna go with American Kestrels because they’re so small and yet such feisty birds. They’re fighters and I love it!

• I am involved with AOS because:
Because I love and research birds and I think it’s important to connect with others who do as well to progress ornithology and the overlapping fields of research. Science is nothing if it’s not being shared and pushed forward.

• The best part about being a member of AOS is:
Connecting with people who are as passionate as you are about wildlife and science!

• Birds are important to me because:
I think they are an amazingly unique group of organisms and are vital to the ecological functions of this planet, on top of just being very cool creatures and fun to work with.

• Advice I have to offer a student (master’s level or younger) in ornithology:
Get involved in everything. Like yesterday.

• One ornithology question or problem I would like to solve or see solved:
How humans can coexist with birds with minimal negative impact on them. Also why have AMKE’s been on the decline for 40 years?

 

Faces of AOS: Danielle Belleny Bio

• Email:
ybelleny@gmail.com

• Twitter Handle:
@bellzetal

• My position with AOS:
Communications Committee member

• My current full-time title and institution:
Graduate Research Assistant, Tarleton State University

• My current career stage:
Graduate Student

• My lineage of mentors/labs:
Caesar Kleberg Wildlife Research Institute (undergraduate)
Tarleton State University (graduate) mentors – Dr. Heather Mathewson, Dr. Jeff Breeden, Dr. John Tomecek, Dr. Thomas Wayne Schwertner, Dr. Jim Giocomo

• #badlyexplainyourjob:
I give bobwhite cute necklaces that allow me to secretly track their birdy habits. They lead me to their nests where I further invade their privacy by putting up surveillance cameras (to watch for predators, totally not a creep).

• My favorite bird and why:
Shoebill – Terrifying and glowering swamp bosses that have razor-sharp bills. They eat monitor lizards and baby crocodiles… that means shoebills are dinosaur-eating dinosaurs. What’s not to love?

• I am involved with AOS because:
To be involved with avian research and meet colleagues

• The best part about being a member of AOS is:
Being able to join committees and help improve the AOS experience for other members

• Birds are important to me because:
I especially like to reflect on the beauty and personality birds add to an ecosystem. Birds are very charismatic and when I visit new places there is a unique energy provided by the species present.

• Advice I have to offer a student (master’s level or younger) in ornithology:
You’re capable of more than you give yourself credit for

• One ornithology question or problem I would like to solve or see solved:
Ways to reduce avian fatalities from renewable energy structures

 

Faces of AOS: Tom Sherry Bio

• Email:
tsherry@tulane.edu

• Twitter Handle:
@ThomasWSherry

• Website/Blog/Etc:
http://www.tulane.edu/~Sherry27/

• My position with AOS:
AOS Fellow and President Elect (2020)

• My current full-time title and institution:
Professor, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and New Day Professor III and Siegel Professor in Social Entrepreneurship, Phyllis M. Taylor Center for Social Innovation and Design Thinking Tulane University

• My current career stage:
Senior Professional

• My lineage of mentors/labs:
Undergraduate research, MS degree, and post-doc with Richard T. Holmes, Dartmouth College.
Ph.D. UCLA with advisor Henry A. Hespenheide

• #badlyexplainyourjob:
I study how birds get along with same kinds and with other kinds of birds, which is better than humans get along, which is why I study how to protect birds and their homes.

• My favorite bird and why:
Every bird species I’ve studied. However, I have a large photo in my office of a Cuban Tody with a large insect in its beak, and another of a Cocos Finch probing in a hibiscus flower.

• I am involved with AOS because:
I was hooked on science and birds doing field work as an undergraduate and attending my first scientific conference (Winnipeg AOU, 1975). Most of my research and conservation activities center on birds, and AOS is both a great fit and a great opportunity to work with others to pass on my love of birds and of nature.

• The best part about being a member of AOS is:
The journals (even when they don’t accept my manuscripts), the meetings to network and catch up on cutting edge research, and increasingly the awesome website.

• Birds are important to me because:
I know birds better than any other taxon because I started out watching them at an early age to entertain myself in the woods (growing up summers in the Adirondack Mts., NY), and birds provide unlimited opportunities for science and conservation: migratory birds are fairly unique among migratory animals, tropical birds are poorly understood, and birds are strategic for conservation because of so many bird enthusiasts globally.

• Advice I have to offer a student (master’s level or younger) in ornithology:
Get lab and field experience as early and often as you can. Then follow-up on your observations that don’t fit prevailing explanations.

• One ornithology question or problem I would like to solve or see solved:
Why are so many tropical species specialized ecologically and evolutionarily?

• Fun random fact about myself:
I played fiddle with contradance bands while a graduate student and post-doc.

• Something else birdy I’d like to share:
I look forward to listening to anyone with ideas on how to strengthen the AOS and its impacts, particularly in the Western Hemisphere.