AOS welcomes new Communications Specialist

Rebecca_Heisman_03 - CopyAOS is excited to welcome Rebecca Heisman as our new Communications Specialist! Rebecca will be working part time through the end of the year and joining AOS as our first full-time communications staff member in January 2019. Among other duties, Rebecca will be taking the reins of AOS’s Twitter account, Facebook page, and website.

Rebecca spent the past four years as a freelance writer and science communicator (with The Auk and The Condor among her clients). Prior to that, she earned a master’s degree in natural resources and was a field technician for bird research projects in Canada and Australia.

Rebecca is looking forward to finding new ways that AOS’s various communications channels can serve the society’s members. If you have any ideas to share about this, she’d love to hear from you! You can contact her at rheisman@americanornithology.org.

Importance of Participating in the Process of Nominations

A great way to become engaged in your society is to participate in annual nominations and elections for Officers and Councilors. We invite all members to submit nominations for the four AOS Elective Councilor positions, the AOS Secretary and the AOS Treasurer. Nominations should be submitted to the Secretary by 30 November 2018. Note: nominations require the consent of the nominee. Please e-mail nominations to AOS Secretary, Andrew Jones, at Secretary@americanornithology.org.

Elections will take place by electronic and paper ballots in advance of the 137th Stated Meeting of the AOS in Anchorage, AK, in June 2019. We are pleased that our incumbent Secretary Andrew Jones, and Treasurer Rebecca Kimball, have agreed to stand for re-election. Of the twelve Elective Councilors, four are elected annually to serve terms of approximately three years, beginning at the close of the next Stated Meeting. Elective Councilors rotating off Council at the conclusion of the 137th Stated Meeting in Anchorage next June are Melissa Bowlin, Renee Duckworth, Scott Edwards, and Nathaniel Wheelwright. Continuing to serve in 2019-2020 will be Elective Councilors Anna Chalfoun, Abby Powell, Andrea Townsend, Mike Webster, Sara Morris, Sharon Gill, Peter Dunn, and Christopher Witt.

Additional information describing AOS’s governance and the nomination-election process is available on the AmericanOrnithology.org website.

Please e-mail nominations and any inquiries to AOS Secretary, Andrew Jones, at Secretary@americanornithology.org.

Faces of AOS: Evan M. Adams Bio

• Email:
evan.adams@briloon.org

• Twitter Handle:
@eco_evan

• Website/Blog/Etc:
http://www.briloon.org/evan-adams-m-s-ph-d-candidate

• My position with AOS:
Early Professional Committee Member and Subcommittee — Professional Development Co-Chair

• My current full-time title and institution:
Quantitative Ecologist, Biodiversity Research Institute

• My current career stage:
Early Professional

• My lineage of mentors/labs:
Masters- Peter Frederick at the University of Florida
Ph.D. – Brian Olsen at the University of Maine.
Post-doc – Beth Gardner at the University of Washington.

• #badlyexplainyourjob:
I want to know how birds respond to environmental change. So I get help counting birds from a bunch of people, figure out who is the best at counting birds, then correct everybody’s counts and figure out why bird populations change.

• My favorite bird and why:
The Blackpoll Warbler because they fly for three days over the open ocean and are tiny.

• I am involved with AOS because:
I am interested in both bird conservation and science and the AOS is an organization that is committed to both.

• The best part about being a member of AOS is:
The community of excellent scientists and the learning I get to do with them.

• Birds are important to me because:
Birds are beautiful animals that tell us really interesting and important things about how the world works. I like to like to do research on them so we can understand those things better and also do the best possible job of keeping the current diversity of birds on this planet.

• Advice I have to offer a student (master’s level or younger) in ornithology:
Find a great mentor who can both get you excited about science but also turn that passion into great science.

• One ornithology question or problem I would like to solve or see solved:
I’d like to better understand how birds are going to adapt to climate change and non-analog climates.

 

Faces of AOS: Scott Sillett Bio

• Email:
silletts@si.edu

• Twitter Handle:
@ScottSillett

• Website/Blog/Etc:
https://nationalzoo.si.edu/conservation/t-scott-sillett

• My position with AOS:
Fellow; Editor in Chief of The Auk, beginning August 2018

• My current full-time title and institution:
Research Wildlife Biologist, Smithsonian Institution

• My current career stage:
Mid-Career

• My lineage of mentors/labs:
Undergrad: Stephen Russell, William Calder, University of Arizona;
Masters: J.V. Remsen, Jr., Louisiana State University;
PhD: Richard Holmes, Dartmouth College;
Postdoc: Jim Nichols, USGS Patuxent

• #badlyexplainyourjob:
I study individual, marked birds throughout their lives, preferably in pleasing locations.

• My favorite bird and why:
Greater Roadrunner (https://www.dailymotion.com/video/xxlwv5)

• I am involved with AOS because:
The AOS is my primary professional society and a great community of friends and scholars.

• The best part about being a member of AOS is:
Excellent journals and annual meetings.

• Birds are important to me because:
They are easy to count.

• Advice I have to offer a student (master’s level or younger) in ornithology:
Resist entropy.

• One ornithology question or problem I would like to solve or see solved:
Track migratory hummingbirds between breeding and winter grounds.

 

Scott Sillett named Editor-in-chief of The Auk: Ornithological Advances, a journal of the American Ornithological Society

The American Ornithological Society (AOS) announces the appointment of T. Scott Sillett as the 19theditor-in-chief of the international journal, The Auk: Ornithological Advances, one of two peer-reviewed journals published by the AOS. Dr. Sillett brings a powerful combination of scientific breadth and accomplishment, editorial experience, and vision for the journal at the global level. He will begin his position this August during the journal’s 134th year of publication.

Dr. Sillett was appointed by the AOS Council to lead the journal based on his many strengths, including his innovative strategies to address the shifting landscape for scholarly publishing and his solid grounding in the ornithological research communities across the Americas. Sillett is a Research Wildlife Biologist at the Smithsonian National Zoological Park and Conservation Biology Institute and is a Fellow of the AOS.

“I am honored to be chosen as the next editor-in-chief of The Auk, and look forward to working with the AOS to continue the journal’s legacy of excellence and innovation,” said Sillett. He is committed to work with colleagues to elevate the journal’s international recognition for its cutting edge science involving birds.

Sillett will place a high priority on raising the global profile of ornithological research by recruiting editorial board members for The Auk from emerging research communities.

“The international ornithological communityis increasingly producing exciting ornithological science that The Aukis uniquely positioned to make widely accessible. We are excited to see a significant increase in ornithological studies and international collaboration in the Americas particularly, but also throughout the world. The AOS can ensure this quality research is distributed widely,” said Kathy Martin, president of the AOS.

The Auk: Ornithological Advances publishes original research advancing the fundamental scientific knowledge of broad biological concepts (e.g., ecology, evolution, behavior, physiology, and genetics) through studies of birds, with emphasis on novel, timely, and broadly significant research for publication. The Auk thrived while under the editorship of Dr. Mark Hauber from 2013 to present. The journal consistently tops the 5‐yr‐average journal impact factor scores among 24 ornithology journals worldwide.

About the American Ornithological Society
The American Ornithological Society (AOS) is the largest, most influential ornithological society in the world. The society provides exemplary leadership in ornithological research, a rigorous scientific basis for the conservation of birds, and invests more in research awards and direct support of students and early professionals than any other society devoted to ornithology. The AOS publishes two international journals—The Auk: Ornithological Advances, and The Condor: Ornithological Applications—which have a history of the highest scientific impact rankings among ornithological journals worldwide, and the book series, Studies in Avian Biology. The Society’s checklists serve as the accepted authority for scientific nomenclature and English names of birds in North, Middle, and South America. The AOS is also a partner in the online publication of The Birds of North America with the Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology. For more information, see www.americanornithology.org.